Va. Bar: Loosen automatic duplication of other jurisdictions' disbarments, suspensions etc.?

Should we loosen rules that automatically suspend lawyers who were disciplined in another jurisdiction, and that ensure they get the same punishment that the other jurisdiction imposed ? The Virginia State Bar thinks so, but it wants comments by August 6 on a thorough proposal about this. 

Generally, the existing rules are good: they protect the public so that disbarred  lawyers can't just hop from one state to another. They make the discipline process more efficient for the bar and the defendants, so the same offenses aren't litigated twice.

But a problem was revealed recently in a case where a lawyer was banned from a particular Federal tribunal, for reasons that never would have called for complete suspension or disbarment from the state bar. And although the tribunal was technically another "jurisdiction" under the ethics rules, the judge's banishment of the lawyer from that one tribunal was never intended to be as severe as a disbarment. He was trying to ban the guy from his tribunal, not put him out of business entirely.

The new proposal addresses all the potential problems with that case and several others the drafters anticipate. Please look at it and tell the Bar's Executive Director what you think, via publiccomment@vsb.org. All public comments are shared with the entire governing Council of the bar several days in advance of any vote on a proposal.

Go to: Proposed Paragraph 13-24 regarding disbarment, revocation, or suspension in another jurisdiction (Comments due August 6, 2016. Pending consideration by Council.)


Bills would let unregulated gov't non-lawyers file serious court cases against parents, without a lawyer's signature

A bill now in Virginia's  Senate and House of Delegates would let Virginia welfare agencies file court cases against parents without a lawyer signing off on the case -- fundamentally changing the traditional role of law practice as a regulated, accountable profession bound by ethics rules. These are very serious cases that can take apart families, destroy parents' finances and livelihoods, and lead to their being jailed for contempt.

Currently, legal ethics rules, court rules, and the Sanctions statute require all lawsuits to be signed by a lawyer (except for people who represent themselves), and require the lawyer to believe, after due investigation, that the suit is well-founded in the facts and the law and not filed simply to harass, impoverish or delay the other party. They also require lawyers to be truthful to courts, opponents and others involved.  The bill, and the statutes it amends, do not do anything to make these new case-filers subject to those rules. And even if it did, that would not be the same as requiring a lawyer to put her credibility and hard-earned license on the line every time she signs a court filing. 

Welfare agencies do great work but like anyone, they do get things wrong, out of negligence or simply normal human imperfection, not malevolence or corruption. Requiring a lawyer to sign off on these case filings is an important protection for the public, reducing the chances of a completely groundless prosecution, ensuring due process of law, and providing accountability when things go wrong. An example, where a judge felt strongly that sanctions and lawyers' fees should be awarded to the victim of a groundless civil child-abuse suit, is FAIRFAX COUNTY DEPT. OF HUMAN DEV. V. DONALD, 251 Va. 227 (Va. 1996). 

The drafters seem to think that providing standard, foolproof check-box forms (which already exist) removes the need for lawyers. But having non-lawyers draft the forms is never a problem and is not the issue. The issue is protecting citizens and courts, by holding even the do-goodingest government agencies to the same basic rules that govern any other person, corporation or agency that takes someone else to court.

The bill adds to Code § 16.1-260 on Juvenile Court filings:

"designated nonattorney employees of a local department of social services may complete, sign, and file with the clerk, on forms approved by the Supreme Court of Virginia, petitions for foster care review, petitions for permanency planning hearings, petitions to establish paternity, motions to establish or modify support, motions to amend or review an order, and motions for a rule to show cause;"

[Note: "Motions to amend or review" includes modification of any existing child custody, visitation or placement order. "Rule to show cause" means contempt of court, including up to a year in jail and setting amounts of support arrears to be paid in order to get out of jail.]

It adds to § 54.1-3900, on who can practice law:

Nothing herein shall prohibit designated nonattorney employees of a local department of social services from appearing before an intake officer to initiate a case in accordance with subsection A of § 16.1-260 on behalf of the local department of social services.

Nothing herein shall prohibit designated nonattorney employees of a local department of social services from completing, signing, and filing with the clerk of the juvenile and domestic relations district court, on forms approved by the Supreme Court of Virginia, petitions for foster care review, petitions for permanency planning hearings, petitions to establish paternity, motions to establish or modify support, motions to amend or review an order, or motions for a rule to show cause.

And it adds to Code § 63.2-332, "The local director shall designate nonattorney employees who are authorized to (i) initiate a case on behalf of the local department by appearing before an intake officer or (ii) complete, sign, and file with the clerk of the juvenile and domestic relations district court, on forms approved by the Supreme Court of Virginia, petitions for foster care review, petitions for permanency planning hearings, petitions to establish paternity, motions to establish or modify support, motions to amend or review an order, or motions for a rule to show cause."

The proposal is in two bills which appear identical: House Bill 589 and SB 417SB 417 passed the State Senate 20 to 17, with three Senators not voting. I'm proud to say my William & Mary law classmates Jennifer Wexton and Ryan McDougle, Fairfax Senators Chap Petersen and Scott Surovell, my old Senator Tommy Norment, and Donald McEachin all voted Nay. It is now in the House Courts of Justice - Civil Law Subcommittee. It is on the Committee's agenda for this coming Monday, Feb. 22. The subcommittee's members are Delegates Habeeb (Chairman), Kilgore, Loupassi, Minchew, Leftwich, Campbell, Miyares, Toscano, McClellan,  and Krizek. The full Courts committee's members are Delegates Albo (Chairman), Kilgore, Bell, Robert B., Cline, Gilbert, Miller, Loupassi, Habeeb, Minchew, Morris, Leftwich, Adams,Campbell, Collins, Miyares, Watts, Toscano, Herring, McClellan, Hope, Mason, and Krizek.

HBl 589 passed the House almost unanimously and is now in the Senate Courts of Justice Committee, which also meets this coming Monday.

Almost as bad, I see that Code § 54.1-3900 already has existing language allowing this practice for child-support filings. Even though Social Services already has its own internal administrative tribunals that can make and review child support orders without lawyers. It reads:

Nothing herein shall prohibit designated nonattorney employees of the Department of Social Services from completing, signing and filing petitions and motions relating to the establishment, modification, or enforcement of support on forms approved by the Supreme Court of Virginia in Department cases in the juvenile and domestic relations district courts. 

If I understand correctly, this was added a few years ago to protect the validity of existing support orders after it was discovered that some non-lawyer social services employees were already doing this. But they could have done that without allowing the practice to continue and be authorized by the state. The existing language is bad enough but the new version would cover many more kinds of cases. Ideally, an amendment-as substitute should delete that existing language and drop all the new language currently in SB417

If you want to see what protections this bill takes away from parents, Here is Code § 8.01-271.1:

§ 8.01-271.1. Signing of pleadings, motions, and other papers; oral motions; sanctions.

Except as otherwise provided in §§ 16.1-260 and 63.2-1901, every pleading, written motion, and other paper of a party represented by an attorney shall be signed by at least one attorney of record in his individual name, and the attorney's address shall be stated on the first pleading filed by that attorney in the action. A party who is not represented by an attorney, including a person confined in a state or local correctional facility proceeding pro se, shall sign his pleading, motion, or other paper and state his address.

The signature of an attorney or party constitutes a certificate by him that (i) he has read the pleading, motion, or other paper, (ii) to the best of his knowledge, information and belief, formed after reasonable inquiry, it is well grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law, and (iii) it is not interposed for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation. If a pleading, written motion, or other paper is not signed, it shall be stricken unless it is signed promptly after the omission is called to the attention of the pleader or movant.

An oral motion made by an attorney or party in any court of the Commonwealth constitutes a representation by him that (i) to the best of his knowledge, information and belief formed after reasonable inquiry it is well grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification or reversal of existing law, and (ii) it is not interposed for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.

If a pleading, motion, or other paper is signed or made in violation of this rule, the court, upon motion or upon its own initiative, shall impose upon the person who signed the paper or made the motion, a represented party, or both, an appropriate sanction, which may include an order to pay to the other party or parties the amount of the reasonable expenses incurred because of the filing of the pleading, motion, or other paper or making of the motion, including a reasonable attorney's fee.


How is family law like pornography? Google Ads is going to censor it, that's how.

Raleigh, NC lawyer Lee Rosen has been THE cutting-edge lawyer for every new innovation in law practice and firm management for the past 20 years, at least in my field, family law. When a friend of mine got a job with him in the late '90s, she wasn't given her own office or cubicle -- no one was. Instead, the firm had different areas for doing different kinds of work, like a hospital. It was exactly what she needed, as someone who, like many of us, had trouble focusing and staying  on task without some social and environmental reinforcement. Already, back then, The Rosen Firm had a form on its web site where you could check boxes for all the different issues in your family law case and get a quote for the firm's flat fee, a billing practice that eliminates most of the worry, friction, heartache and regret from the attorney-client relationship. Later I got a notice that the firm was closing its offices and replacing them with home/mobile offices and small conference centers. If it had been anyone else, it would have been a self-parodying last hurrah of a quickly-disappearing business, but since it was from Lee, I knew it was the wave of the future -- indeed, a long-overdue adaptation to the present. Lee -- still the owner of a relatively large law firm for our field -- posted a picture of his office -- his Macbook Air on a small folding bookcase in his kitchen. Then I heard he was getting rid of all his books via a service that scans them for a flat fee of a dollar apiece. Then most of the stuff in his house. Then his house,  following the same principle he already applied to office equipment, software, data storage, and most clerical services: why own when you can rent, why lease when you can month-to month, why that when you can on-demand? Today he's more prominent as a firm management consultant, trainer and speaker. He has always kept a hawk's eye on customer service, and on what everything we do looks and feels like to potential clients, and what they expect from other businesses they deal with.

Anyhow, today's issue of Divorce Discourse, Lee's longtime blog/newsletter, is titled "How Family Law Is Like Pornography". Its news was shocking and frustrating, at least to divorce lawyers: A message from Google's web advertising service said that "interest-based" banner/sidebar advertising would no longer include several sensitive subjects, including divorce. A sobering reminder of where family law stands.

And yet, when you think about it, it makes sense. These are ads that tell you, and anyone looking at your computer, what you have been searching for and reading. And of course it's not really censorship, that's just a shorthand, in a twitter-length headline, for a decision by a private company about who to do business with and what unsolicited images and words to stick into people's computer screens.